Developing our Tameside Supported Housing service

1 in 4 people in the UK experience mental health issues each year, and incredible work is being done across the country to tackle mental health stigma. Richmond Fellowship supports tens of thousands of people across the country every year, providing tailored support to tie in with each person’s needs, interests and aspirations – and we are proud that 97% of people who use our services feel that Richmond Fellowship has improved their quality of life, and 93% feel safe and secure in our services.  

Supported housing is one of the key models of support we offer. As well as offering a safe, welcoming place for people to live, the support provided helps people along their path of recovery to independent living. We are proud to have run supported housing services in Tameside for many years, and have never had any problems with the local community in that time. We are committed to continually improving the quality of the properties we provide. Our new property would replace ageing accommodation, and will be a modern, self-contained flat complex with support staff on-site 24/7 in order to provide the best recovery environment for the people we support. 

We will be talking to local people in order to hear any concerns and promote understanding of our work and services.

Statement – Richmond Psychosocial Foundation International

A spokesperson from Richmond Fellowship said:

“There is no connection between Richmond Fellowship and Richmond Psychosocial Foundation International (RPFI).

The founder of Richmond Fellowship is associated with Richmond Psychosocial Foundation but has had no involvement in the operations or direction of Richmond Fellowship since 1991.”

Isle of Wight mental health drop-in service media statement

Our Safe Haven on the Isle of Wight, a drop in service for people experiencing a mental health crisis, is currently open for limited hours due to staff shortages.

Sue Lightfoot, Head of Commissioning Mental Health, Learning Disability and Dementia at NHS Isle of Wight Clinical Commissioning Group, said:

This situation is very worrying for anyone using this service, and also difficult for the staff at Richmond Fellowship, who are committed to offering people the best possible support.

We are actively working with Richmond Fellowship now to make sure a service, albeit with reduced hours, continues to operate – safely – over the coming weeks, to ensure that support is still available to those in need. Existing staff from other Richmond Fellowship services have volunteered to work extra hours to offer this support.

There are of course other sources of support available, including the Community Mental Health Team crisis line 01983 522214, or the Samaritans on Freephone 116 123, but the drop-in service plays an important role and we hope it can continue.

Looking further ahead, we are also working with Richmond Fellowship to recruit new members of staff so that the service can quickly be returned to a sustainable footing. This recruitment is under way already and we expect the Safe Haven to be operating a full service in the New Year.

 

Richmond Fellowship Fenland service featured on ITV News Anglia

Richmond Fellowship’s Fenland Wellbeing service in Cambridgeshire has been featured on ITV News Anglia.

The service was asked to take part in a piece on Thursday 27 September about an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report which ranked Fenland as one of the unhappiest places to live in the country.

People completing the ONS survey were asked to rank their happiness, sense of the things they do being worthwhile and life satisfaction out of 10, with 10 being the highest.

The average happiness score for Fenland was 6.7, compared to the UK average of 7.52.

The survey covered the period from March 2017 to March 2018.

According to the report, the happiest place to live in the UK was Rushmoor in Hampshire.

You can see a video of the report here.

Find out more about our Fenland Wellbeing service.