Staff, volunteers and people we support recognised at ENRICH Awards 2019

Winning Kensington and Chelsea team

Staff, volunteers and people we support at Richmond Fellowship came together to celebrate the outstanding work happening across the organisation at the ENRICH Awards.

The awards, which took place on Thursday 21 March at London Metropolitan University, are based on Richmond Fellowship’s six organisational values (Enabling, Networking, Respect, Inclusion, Community and Hope).

Over 124 nominations were received across 10 categories – with over 50 nominations alone for the Inspiring Individual Staff Award category.

The winners:

Excellence in Innovation
Winner: Lowther Street Crisis House
Highly Commended: Macclesfield Homeless and Complex Needs Service and Trevayler Care Home

The nominees enjoying some Bhangra Drumming

Excellence in Partnership Working
Winner: East Surrey Work Programme
Highly Commended: My Time Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programme and Tyne, Wear and Northumberland Liaison and Diversion Service

Excellence in Engagement
Winner: RF Connect (Internal case management system)
Highly Commended: Pele Tower and Wiltshire Recovery and Social Inclusion Service

Excellence in Inclusion
Winner: Kensington and Chelsea Supported Housing Service
Highly Commended: Suffolk Recovery and The Old Moat

Hope Award: Nominated by the People We Support
Winner: Leicestershire Life Links
Highly Commended: Mid and West Surrey Employment Service and North West Surrey Employment Service

Ayesha receiving her Chief Executive’s Award from Derek Caren

Central Services Team Recognition Award
Winner: Communications and Marketing
Highly Commended: Learning and Development and Business Development

Inspiring Individual Staff Award
Winners: Christine (Locality Manager, Midlands), Simon (Employment Advisor, Mid and West Surrey Employment Service)
Highly Commended: Damian (Recovery Worker, Kensington and Chelsea Supported Housing Service), Emily (Group Internal Communications Officer), Hannah (Employment Advisor, Kirklees Employment Service), Rachael (Community Link Worker, Tyne, Wear and Northumberland Liaison and Diversion Service) and Stephen (Recovery Worker, Tower House)

Inspiring Individual People We Support Award
Winner: Angela (Suffolk Recovery)
Highly Commended: Berenice (Cambridge Employment Service) and Ethan (Redcar and Cleveland Supported Housing Service)

Volunteer Recognition Award
Winners: Ste (Working Together Committee) and Miriam (Funding and Development Volunteer, DVIP)
Highly Commended: Elizabeth (Recovery Workshops Assistant, Wiltshire Recovery and Social Inclusion Service)

Chief Executive’s Award
Winner: Ayesha (Recovery Worker, Moorview Supported Housing Service)

Derek Caren, Chief Executive of Richmond Fellowship said:

‘The ENRICH Awards celebrate the outstanding work and achievements that take place across Richmond Fellowship. This year was made extra special as we are celebrating 60 years of Richmond Fellowship. As a member of the judging panel, I was blown away by all of the nominations we received and I would like to congratulate each and every individual and team who were nominated. I would also like to personally thank our sponsors: Bob Rehill, CDP Soft, Energycentic, Castleton, uMarketeers, Yuuzuu, MEA, Kainos and Lloyds Bank for helping to make the awards so special’.

Richmond Fellowship recognised for promoting equality and diversity

Richmond Fellowship has once again been placed in the top 100 organisations for promoting diversity, equality and inclusion by the National Centre for Diversity (NCFD).

Richmond Fellowship was ranked number 92 in the country, in recognition of its work to promote diversity, inclusiveness and equality across the organisation.

Tracey Bell, Director of Performance, Quality and Innovation at Richmond Fellowship said:

“It’s great news that in 2019 we are again ranked in the top 100. We’re incredibly proud of our diverse workforce and the range of experience our staff bring to supporting people using our services. This achievement is down to the hard work and commitment of everyone in Richmond Fellowship to promoting diversity and inclusion and to working together with the people we support to shape our services.

I am particularly proud that Richmond Fellowship’s mean gender pay gap, at 5.93%, is significantly lower that the not for profit sector average of 19.4%. Also that, while we recognise there is always more for us to do, 82% of staff in Richmond Fellowship feel that their colleagues work in accordance with the principles of Fairness, Respect, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion.”

Richmond Fellowship also holds Investors in Diversity status in recognition of its work to provide opportunities for people living with mental ill health and to ensure diversity right across the organisation.

Statement – Richmond Psychosocial Foundation International

A spokesperson from Richmond Fellowship said:

“We would like to make it clear that there is no connection between Richmond Fellowship and Richmond Psychosocial Foundation International.

“The founder of Richmond Fellowship is associated with Richmond Psychosocial Foundation but has had no involvement in the operations or direction of Richmond Fellowship since 1991.

“To find out more about our work and our mission ‘Making Recovery Reality’ please visit www.richmondfellowship.org.uk

Lancashire Care partnership shortlisted for HSJ Partnership Awards

An innovative partnership between a local health and wellbeing provider and mental health recovery charity, which involves working together to support people in mental health crisis, has been shortlisted for the HSJ Partnership Awards 2019.

The number of people requiring mental health treatment in the UK is rising and at the same time, the number of mental health hospital beds has dramatically decreased. With this in mind, Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust and Richmond Fellowship have been working together, to develop alternative ways of providing support for those in mental health crisis and have been successfully shortlisted for the HSJ Partnership Awards 2019.

The partnership has been shortlisted for the ‘Best Not for Profit Working in Partnership with the NHS’ category for their efforts in collectively working together to improve mental health crisis care.

The organisations have been working together since 2016 and have opened two crisis houses in Lancashire, which provide a small number of beds and a safe, home-like environment. The partners have also developed an innovative model of supporting people who attend A&E in crisis, Mental Health Decision Units, and runs Sparky’s Café at The Harbour Hospital in Blackpool, providing apprenticeship opportunities for people recovering from mental ill health to help them get back into employment.

Sue Moore, Director of Strategic Developments at Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust said:

“We are delighted that our partnership with Richmond Fellowship has been shortlisted for the HSJ Partnership Awards 2019. We have been experiencing high demand for mental health services in Lancashire for some time and we are absolutely committed to ensuring that people are able to access the right care when they most need it. This has involved some innovative thinking with our partners about how we redesign or provide different support to the people that we serve.

“Working together with Richmond Fellowship has allowed us to really enhance the services that we provide and be able to deliver high quality care to the people that matter. It is a privilege to be part of so many fantastic projects and we are really proud that our work has been recognised nationally!”

Joe Redmond, Managing Director – Richmond Fellowship (North) said:

“Richmond Fellowship has a strong track record of providing a wide range of mental health services, including support for people experiencing a crisis. We work with a large number of NHS Trusts and we have a particularly strong partnership with Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust. Together we have developed a range of innovative approaches which are helping to tackle the rising demand for mental health services.

“For example, not everyone with mental ill health needs or wants to go into hospital or to be there any longer than necessary. This is where our crisis houses come in – they provide a safe, supportive environment in the local community where local people can develop coping skills to help with their recovery.  After quite short stays, people are telling us they feel more able to return back home and take control of their lives.”

The winners will be announced at the prestigious ceremony on 20 March 2019 at Park Plaza in Westminster.

For more information or to view the full shortlist please visit https://partnership.hsj.co.uk/

Isle of Wight mental health drop-in service media statement

Our Safe Haven on the Isle of Wight, a drop in service for people experiencing a mental health crisis, is currently open for limited hours due to staff shortages.

Sue Lightfoot, Head of Commissioning Mental Health, Learning Disability and Dementia at NHS Isle of Wight Clinical Commissioning Group, said:

This situation is very worrying for anyone using this service, and also difficult for the staff at Richmond Fellowship, who are committed to offering people the best possible support.

We are actively working with Richmond Fellowship now to make sure a service, albeit with reduced hours, continues to operate – safely – over the coming weeks, to ensure that support is still available to those in need. Existing staff from other Richmond Fellowship services have volunteered to work extra hours to offer this support.

There are of course other sources of support available, including the Community Mental Health Team crisis line 01983 522214, or the Samaritans on Freephone 116 123, but the drop-in service plays an important role and we hope it can continue.

Looking further ahead, we are also working with Richmond Fellowship to recruit new members of staff so that the service can quickly be returned to a sustainable footing. This recruitment is under way already and we expect the Safe Haven to be operating a full service in the New Year.

 

Old Moat Garden Centre scoops local business award

Richmond Fellowship’s Old Moat Garden Centre has scooped an accolade at the annual Epsom and Ewell Business Excellence Awards in Surrey.

The social enterprise won the Commitment in the Community category at the awards which celebrate excellence in the local community.

An engraved glass trophy was presented to The Old Moat team by the local MP and Secretary of State for Transport, Chris Grayling at a special ceremony on Thursday 15 November.

Jack Shilley, Garden Centre Manager said:

“I am absolutely delighted that The Old Moat has received this award. It filled me with immense pride to collect the award on behalf of the business with some of the team. It is a real testament to all of our staff and volunteers’ hard work and dedication, and of course a huge thanks to the people we support – the reason why we all do what we do.”

Find out more about The Old Moat at www.theoldmoatgardencentre.org.uk.

Richmond Fellowship Fenland service featured on ITV News Anglia

Richmond Fellowship’s Fenland Wellbeing service in Cambridgeshire has been featured on ITV News Anglia.

The service was asked to take part in a piece on Thursday 27 September about an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report which ranked Fenland as one of the unhappiest places to live in the country.

People completing the ONS survey were asked to rank their happiness, sense of the things they do being worthwhile and life satisfaction out of 10, with 10 being the highest.

The average happiness score for Fenland was 6.7, compared to the UK average of 7.52.

The survey covered the period from March 2017 to March 2018.

According to the report, the happiest place to live in the UK was Rushmoor in Hampshire.

You can see a video of the report here.

Find out more about our Fenland Wellbeing service.

Richmond Fellowship reaccredited as Investors in Diversity

Investors-in-Diversity-logoRichmond Fellowship has been reaccredited as an Investor in Diversity.

The accreditation, which the national mental health charity has held since 2016, recognises Richmond Fellowship’s structured and planned approach to embedding Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) at the heart of the organisation.

To retain the accreditation, the National Centre for Diversity carried out an assessment to check the organisation remains focussed on continually building on this area.

The 2018 assessment began in April and included a staff survey asking for views on how well the organisation upholds and promotes the EDI principles, including tackling bullying, harassment and discrimination.

This year Richmond Fellowship also asked a selection of suppliers and other organisations it works with for their views. The assessor also met with a selection of staff from across Richmond Fellowship and with people who use services.

Tracey Bell, Group Director of Performance, Quality and Innovation at Richmond Fellowship said:

“This is a great achievement, recognising how well embedded EDI best practices are in Richmond Fellowship. Thank you to everyone who took part in the comprehensive assessment.”

Tyne and Wear service benefits from £300 mystery donation

Richmond Fellowship’s Tyne and Wear service has benefitted from a £300 mystery donation made during mental health awareness week.

Richmond Fellowship, which provides supported housing, community and employment support in the county, received the generous donation in the post.

A card, which accompanied the cheque in an envelope said:

“Enclosed is a donation for your charity to support people’s recovery from mental health problems. God bless you all for caring. Thank you.”

Since receiving the money, Richmond Fellowship has worked with the people using their services across the locality to find out where the money should be spent. The service chose to do something to create a new experience and build positive memories and organised a day trip to the museum town of Beamish.

With the assistance of local company Limo Bus North East who kindly donated one of their 16-seater limos, the outing took place in July.

Whilst on the trip, those using the local services got to try their hand at mining, visited the local sights and enjoyed an ice cream in the summer sunshine.

Karyn Ainsley, Tyne and Wear Locality Manager said:

“We were all really thrilled when we received the mystery donation. It is the kindness and support of people like our unknown donor that allows us to continue our work here at Tyne and Wear.”

DVIP joins the Recovery Focus Group

Today (Monday 2nd July 2018), the Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP) announced that it has joined the Recovery Focus Group as a division of its largest partner, Richmond Fellowship.

For over 25 years, DVIP has delivered vital services and actively campaigned to end violence against women and girls. Today the London-based charity continues to provide essential services to hold perpetrators to account, end their abusive behaviour and support survivors to create greater space for action and safety for them and their families.

DVIP will work closely with other national partner charities involved in the Recovery Focus Group to identify new and innovative ways to support individuals and families affected by domestic abuse, mental ill health and drug and alcohol use.

Derek Caren, Chief Executive of Recovery Focus, said:

“Today is an extremely exciting day for the Recovery Focus Group and we are delighted to announce DVIP as our newest Group partner. DVIP has a long and proud history of working with families affected by domestic violence and prides itself on leading campaigns to end domestic violence for good. We very much welcome DVIP to our Group and look forward to working with the team in the future to shape new ways of working which inspire recovery in the areas of mental health, drug and alcohol use and domestic violence.”

Marianna Tortell, Managing Director of DVIP, said:

“DVIP is happy to confirm our new partnership with the Recovery Focus Group. Our new Group partners all share a passion and desire to support individuals and families affected by issues such as domestic violence and are committed to working alongside communities to inspire recovery nationwide. Those values reflect what DVIP has been working towards for over 25 years and we look forward to working with our new partners in the future to find new ways to improve the lives of the communities we support. As a proud feminist organisation for over 25 years, DVIP looks forward to working with our new Group partners to continue to work towards ending all forms of violence against women and girls”

DVIP joins Richmond Fellowship, the national mental health charity; Aquarius, the Midlands based drug and alcohol charity; and My Time, a division of Richmond Fellowship, as part of the wider Recovery Focus Group.

Formed in 2015, Recovery Focus is a Group of charities highly experienced in delivering services for people living with mental ill health, drug and alcohol use and domestic violence to achieve their ambitions. All of the partners involved in the Recovery Focus Group believe that with the right support, at the right time, they can meet the shared vision of inspiring individual recovery nationwide.